Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Username: Password:
Pages: [1] 2

Author Topic: Do plants feel pain?  (Read 11525 times)

Roze

  • Senior Member
  • Karma: 157
  • Posts: 691
  • Trading Score: +210
  • After winter, trees are relieved.
Do plants feel pain?
« on: April 26, 2014, 08:35:11 pm »


Scientists conduct a plant experiment that may make you rethink those veggie burgers  ;)



After watching this video from Amazing Plants, you have to wonder - do plants feel pain?
Logged
Be weird.  Be random.   Be who you are.

New Wisdom

  • Professional Cactus Hoarder
  • Global Moderator
  • Karma: 179
  • Posts: 2270
  • Trading Score: +223
  • Zone 6B
Re: Do plants feel pain?
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2014, 10:18:09 pm »

Oh wow. I'm going to have to start anesthetizing my cacti before I graft them. Lol.
Logged
Cactus = Life

BubbleCat

  • Supreme feline leader
  • Administrator
  • Karma: 143
  • Posts: 1906
  • Trading Score: +140
  • <3
Re: Do plants feel pain?
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2014, 07:53:42 pm »

Vegetarians, your argument is invalid !  :P
Logged
Praise is mandatory.

delta9hippie

  • Member
  • Karma: 13
  • Posts: 55
Re: Do plants feel pain?
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2014, 09:57:38 pm »

Thought provoking! +1 :)
Logged
I kind of like plants because they made the Earth inhabitable.

SlowGrow

  • Senior Member
  • Karma: 23
  • Posts: 147
  • Trading Score: +7
Re: Do plants feel pain?
« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2014, 12:21:59 am »

this was very interesting. it makes you really think.. I do think they feel something for sure, and they defiantly know when they are being damaged/ "hurt." It isn't pleasant for anything/anyone..  :(
Logged

Skautroll

  • Happy Hoarder
  • Trader
  • Karma: 15
  • Posts: 51
  • Trading Score: +31
Re: Do plants feel pain?
« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2014, 01:44:35 pm »

I read "Plants and the human Brain" by David O. Kennedy recently, it explains how plants release a cocktail of volatile signaling compounds, kind of like plant "pheromones", whenever leaves, stem or roots get cuts or bruises. This start a cascade signaling between the plants own leaves as well other plants nearby, neighbors that often doesn't even need to be related species. Plants got ways of "learning", they got cell receptors and they got complex hormonal type of communication but, lets be careful about calling it pain. its more like discomfort. When plants are fed on, which they are very used too, they respond by balancing replacement of lost tissue and producing feed detergents against the attacking invertebrates. Plants remember what works against specific attacking pests, but keep in mind that pain is very expensive physiologically, especially maintenance. If we look at insects they keep their neural system to minimum because it drain staggering amounts of energy, they also don't have pain since it doesn't improve survival any more than the same type of epigenetic memory they share both plants and us. Plants spend a lot of energy on producing chemicals, especially for defense against UV and insects, analyzing plant tissue for chemicals takes immense amounts of work because there is no end to the amount of different chemicals each of them produce. 

That video also forgot to mention that all life is electric and that receptors are all build on the same framework, the g-protein coupled receptor, when signals are relayed from one cell to another there often a small electric pulse involved if the signal need to travel fast. Photosynthesis is also "electric". Thats why ether and chloroform will affect a lot of organisms and why trace amounts of hormones in human urine can boost root growth at the plants we piss on.

Sometimes I find it annoying when popular science has to oversimplify things to the point they are skipping a lot of the interesting details, just to write something sensational.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2014, 01:57:55 pm by Skautroll »
Logged
"Taking yourself too serious, is a serious sign of psychological illness"

happyconcacti

  • Administrator
  • Karma: 188
  • Posts: 1356
  • Trading Score: +330
Re: Do plants feel pain?
« Reply #6 on: November 01, 2014, 07:03:59 pm »

This makes me wonder about the flip-side as well: Do they react to "nice touches"?

Hug a Tree,
Hcc
Logged

bloodysafety

  • Member
  • Karma: 3
  • Posts: 8
Re: Do plants feel pain?
« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2014, 03:39:04 am »

I read "Plants and the human Brain" by David O. Kennedy recently, it explains how plants release a cocktail of volatile signaling compounds, kind of like plant "pheromones", whenever leaves, stem or roots get cuts or bruises. This start a cascade signaling between the plants own leaves as well other plants nearby, neighbors that often doesn't even need to be related species. Plants got ways of "learning", they got cell receptors and they got complex hormonal type of communication but, lets be careful about calling it pain. its more like discomfort. When plants are fed on, which they are very used too, they respond by balancing replacement of lost tissue and producing feed detergents against the attacking invertebrates. Plants remember what works against specific attacking pests, but keep in mind that pain is very expensive physiologically, especially maintenance. If we look at insects they keep their neural system to minimum because it drain staggering amounts of energy, they also don't have pain since it doesn't improve survival any more than the same type of epigenetic memory they share both plants and us. Plants spend a lot of energy on producing chemicals, especially for defense against UV and insects, analyzing plant tissue for chemicals takes immense amounts of work because there is no end to the amount of different chemicals each of them produce. 

That video also forgot to mention that all life is electric and that receptors are all build on the same framework, the g-protein coupled receptor, when signals are relayed from one cell to another there often a small electric pulse involved if the signal need to travel fast. Photosynthesis is also "electric". Thats why ether and chloroform will affect a lot of organisms and why trace amounts of hormones in human urine can boost root growth at the plants we piss on.

Sometimes I find it annoying when popular science has to oversimplify things to the point they are skipping a lot of the interesting details, just to write something sensational.

isnt pain an arbitary word? If pain is defined as the body sensing damage then ALL living things experience it. It may be in degrees relating to an organisms ability to heal and the extent of the complexity of the nervous system(or its equivilent). Alot of insects dont live long enough to recover from an injury AND and exoskeleton is built differently from an endo skeleton...they have to wait for a molt or two to regenerate if they are capeable of healing in the first place. Then theres the getting used to factor. AKA pain threshold. Most wild organisms make us look like pussies. They can and do sustain much more damage that we could imagine without the benifit of medical science. We flat out dont understand things as well as we think we do. Plants are as used to being grazed as i am smashing my hands with a 1.5 lbs. hammer (i do it everyday for a living). It  HURT like a bitch the first few times but now it dosent phase me at all. Pain is only an aknoledgement of damage done. Its not inheritley uncomfortable; as we know many plants evolved to be damaged in the name of reproduction and some evolved to be damaged purely to sustain the ecosystem. Just like I know when a nail is short or my aim is off when i hit my self with a framing hammer; it just dosent hurt like it used to.
Logged

MirlitonVine

  • Trader
  • Karma: 19
  • Posts: 141
  • Trading Score: +23
Re: Do plants feel pain?
« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2015, 01:18:21 am »

I think plants can experience pain. I also think they can experience pleasure when treated kindly. At least I treat my plants kindly. They seem much happier when I spend time with them each day, and if I go out of town for a few days they look droopy when I return.

Regardless of whether they can feel pain or not, imo, they deserve as much respect as any other living thing, after all they give us almost everything we depend on, from the air we breathe to medicines to the materials we construct our houses with to the food we eat. Not to mention all the knowledge they have imparted to the human mind since our species began and the spiritual growth they facilitate. I think people dismiss the idea of plant consciousness because we can have our way with them since they're stuck to the ground and can't fight back. If they could physically fight back when humans abuse them we would think twice.

Remember that movie "the happening"?
« Last Edit: January 30, 2015, 01:22:31 am by MirlitonVine »
Logged

Roze

  • Senior Member
  • Karma: 157
  • Posts: 691
  • Trading Score: +210
  • After winter, trees are relieved.
Re: Do plants feel pain?
« Reply #9 on: March 31, 2015, 02:22:48 pm »

On this video Professor Suzanne Simard shows that all trees in a forest ecosystem are interconnected, with the largest, oldest, "mother trees" serving as hubs. The underground exchange of nutrients increases the survival of younger trees linked into the network of old trees. Mycorrhizal fungi form obligate symbioses with trees, where the tree supplies the fungus with carbohydrate energy in return for water and nutrients the fungal mycelia gather from the soil; mycorrhizal networks form when mycelia connect the roots of two or more plants of the same or different species.

Check it:

Logged
Be weird.  Be random.   Be who you are.

Frog Pajamas

  • Global Moderator
  • Karma: 211
  • Posts: 1707
  • Trading Score: +576
  • Zone 7A
Re: Do plants feel pain?
« Reply #10 on: March 31, 2015, 06:08:26 pm »

This is a documentary by PBS called What Plants Talk About that gets into that same topic, plus a bunch of other cool stuff.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Logged

MirlitonVine

  • Trader
  • Karma: 19
  • Posts: 141
  • Trading Score: +23
Re: Do plants feel pain?
« Reply #11 on: April 03, 2015, 06:39:59 am »

On this video Professor Suzanne Simard shows that all trees in a forest ecosystem are interconnected, with the largest, oldest, "mother trees" serving as hubs. The underground exchange of nutrients increases the survival of younger trees linked into the network of old trees. Mycorrhizal fungi form obligate symbioses with trees, where the tree supplies the fungus with carbohydrate energy in return for water and nutrients the fungal mycelia gather from the soil; mycorrhizal networks form when mycelia connect the roots of two or more plants of the same or different species.

Check it:



If I understand correctly, this research (or research like it) was where some of the concepts in the movie avatar (the tree of life, and the interconnection of all the trees) were inspired by.
Logged

bosqueberg

  • Senior Member
  • Karma: 7
  • Posts: 107
  • Trading Score: +18
Re: Do plants feel pain?
« Reply #12 on: August 11, 2015, 02:40:28 am »

Plants respond to touch, damage, and various pests. While a plant can be hurt, plants lack a central nervous system to process stimuli and to experience it consciously as pain. A decent example would be a person with a severed spinal cord who had lost all sensation and movement below the waist. While the feet will still show physiological responses to injury and firing of pain receptors, the person will not feel any pain. Without the connection to a brain for processing, pain is not experienced. Nevertheless, be kind to plants. plant spirits don't like it when you bully their buddies.
Logged

BubbleCat

  • Supreme feline leader
  • Administrator
  • Karma: 143
  • Posts: 1906
  • Trading Score: +140
  • <3
Re: Do plants feel pain?
« Reply #13 on: August 23, 2015, 02:35:48 am »

Its been a time I have this on my mind I might try outlining it:


I think human understanding of pain greatly depends on human perception of pain. Human perception of pain has been formed by evolution, pain served a purpose in our evolution and a slightly different purpose in plants, or lets say crustaceans.

I think a big difference is that humans are more likely to get infections, dismembering is irreversible and and and...

So for me I guess a plant or maybe a crustacean has a somewhat - or in the first case even greatly - different way of perceiving pain. Since yeah as said pain serves a purpose and depending on its evolutionary importance the perception will be different. Crustaceans for example are able to regenerate some parts in cases of dismemberment, yet instant and active reaction is one of their survival strategies. So if I make an educated guess a lobsters perception of pain is a bit less troubling than a humans. Many plants for comparison have the ability to regenerate large parts and have little to no ability for instant reaction (reflexes like move, run, fight...) thus I conclude evolution might habe given them pain, but not as we understand it as we can expect the perception in a plants case to be very different from the other examples.
Logged
Praise is mandatory.

ONandONandON

  • Senior Member
  • Karma: 29
  • Posts: 537
  • Trading Score: +76
  • Looking 4 Supercalifragilistic Expialidocious Spp.
Re: Do plants feel pain?
« Reply #14 on: February 23, 2019, 09:20:07 pm »

Logged
we all come from the garden and to it we shall return
Pages: [1] 2