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Author Topic: Salvinorin A & B, rosmarinic acid & caffeic acid in Coleus scutellarioides  (Read 171 times)

Pollinator

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Link
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-024-57399-y

Title
The influence of cultivation conditions on the formation of psychoactive salvinorin A, salvinorin B, rosmarinic acid and caffeic acid in Coleus scutellarioides

Abstract
Coleus scutellarioides (L.) Benh. is a popular species in the world, known for its characteristic magnificent colourful leaves. The study has revealed that the contents of rosmarinic acid and caffeic acid are significantly higher in the plant tissues cultivated in vivo than when under in vitro conditions. The performed qualitative and quantitative analyses confirmed the presence (whose averaged content) of salvinorin A (6.65 µg/1 g of fresh plant) and salvinorin B (50.46 µg/1 g of fresh plant) in tissues of Coleus scutellarioides (L.) Benh. of ‘Electric lime’ variety. The greatest quantities of these compounds were recorded for plants cultivated in vitro on the MS medium enriched with NAA (naphthyl-1-acetic acid) at a concentration of 0.5 mg∙ dm–3. The research detected differences in the amounts of compounds between plants grown in vivo and those cultivated in vitro. Addition of plant growth regulators into the breeding medium under in vitro conditions was found affecting the amounts of compounds in plant tissues.
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modern

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Very cool since there were some random reports of it being active. However you would need to have 40x minimum to have any psychoactive effects.

Salvia recognita seems most interesting however the availability of coleus is very high and the colors are wild.
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Best time to sow is 5 years ago...

Pollinator

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I wonder if there are other cultivars, or wild non-cultivated plants, which have higher concentrations than the 'Electric Lime' cultivar that was used in this study. If so it's probably still very low amounts, still interesting all the same to see Salvinorin pop up in this species! Growing conditions also seem to influence concentrations.

Ahh yes, Salvia recognita has some lovely flowers too! Really nice to grow, although a bit of a slow and small growing plant compared to some other Salvias. Salvia glutinosa is another interesting species (less so than S. recognita) which grows very fast and large which could make it more attractive. Hawk Moths seem to love S. glutinosa, it's the only plant I've noticed them on in the garden.
Another post on STS on these Salvias: New psychoactive Salvia species with Salvinorin A & B discovered!

For any UK members reading this and wanting to grow Coleus 'Electric Lime' - in early spring for many years now Tesco’s across the UK has sold multi-packs of different Coleus cultivars with one of them being 'Electric Lime'. It can also be found in garden centres in early spring too so keep an eye out over the next month or so. Usually they're only around for a short period. Sometimes on eBay too.
Also, just as a heads up in case you find any which are unlabelled and look like it - there's another cultivar which looks very similar called 'River Walk'. Still a beautiful plant but if you want the 'Electric Lime' cultivar specifically be sure to find a labelled one or be very familiar with the differences of these cultivars.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2024, 10:11:22 AM by Pollinator »
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BucketChemist

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Thanks for posting this; I've long kept a line of succession of Coleus plants after noticing the rumours of possible phytochemical content. This was bolstered by a possibly coincidental lucid dreaming experience after eating a single leaf, which also coincidentally fell off the plant when I woke up in the middle of the night.
 Anecdotally, one plant that could realistically fit the description 'Electric Lime' showed the most promise in this direction when compared to more purple-tinged varieties on an ad hoc, in vivo basis.

I'd be interested to know the exact distinction between 'Electric Lime' and 'River Walk'. It's likely time to be taking a look in my local garden centres (EU).
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