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Author Topic: button mushrooms  (Read 263 times)

HortyCulture

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button mushrooms
« on: February 03, 2022, 11:27:22 am »

i have experience growing cubes from ms syringe > agar > grain > coir (shoe box) and i want to start growing edibles. it seems like the jump to oysters etc will be simple, even things like lions mane should be relatively easy to learn from here, but buttons seem to be a complicated process in comparison due to two phase composting.

does anybody have any advice on where to get started learning to grow buttons from here? is it even worth doing the two phase composting myself? i am happy to pay a little more (not much) for prepared substrate for now until i can learn the rest of the process, but i want to avoid kits.
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Greenmystery

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Re: button mushrooms
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2022, 09:23:27 pm »

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"Through seed satyagraha we will disobey every law engineered by corporations that violate the rights of nature, farmers rights and our rights to seed freedom and food freedom"

HortyCulture

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Re: button mushrooms
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2022, 11:49:26 pm »

thank you. looks like it will be a bigger job than sterilizing grains! :o i am up for the challenge.
i think keeping that precise temperature might be the biggest problem for me. i will be on the look out for an old refrigerator :D
thanks for the link.
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SanctumOfMoss

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Re: button mushrooms
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2022, 11:00:46 pm »

The more popular edibles are definitely a pretty easy, it'll just be a transition of substrate and/or containers depending on how the species fruits.

A compost based substrate seems to be mildly more work but doable. It also appears that a supplemented straw substrate may work fairly well for them.
I'd encourage you to look at Radical Mycology by Peter McCoy p265-270 which talks about straw and compost. I also just highly recommend the book in general, it's by far the best single book on the all things mycology.

Not to discourage you, but with the price and availability of button mushrooms I'd almost nudge you to try looking at other species that, in my not so humble opinion, taste and look quite a bit more exciting. Although, if you're just in it to learn and experiment go for it. Be sure to let us know how it goes.
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HortyCulture

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Re: button mushrooms
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2022, 07:22:30 am »

thank you for the reply.
i have already started doing the footwork to grow other species such as lions mane, oysters, etc. it looks like the transition from cubes will be very easy compared to buttons, which is why i was not asking about those, but i do have every intention of growing those too :)
that is a fair comment about the cost and availability, however i do think i will eventually grow my own anyway, there is something very special (and uncontaminated) about home grown food.

thank you for the book suggestion, i will try to get hold of a copy, it looks very useful.
thanks for the help.
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HortyCulture

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Re: button mushrooms
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2022, 11:00:39 am »

i managed to find a copy of radical mycology. it is a digital copy but i am going to get a hard copy as soon as i can, it looks like he sells them himself here, for anybody interested:
https://chthaeus.com/collections/books-1/products/radical-mycology-a-treatise-on-seeing-working-with-fungi

it's a great book! it looks very easy to reference and is packed with information. i read through some of the section SanctumOfMoss suggested and i really appreciated the format and will definitely find plenty of use from that section alone. i can't wait to get started reading it cover to cover. thank you for the referral SanctumOfMoss!

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