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Author Topic: Salvia micropropagation  (Read 9103 times)

CEY-19

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Salvia micropropagation
« on: April 01, 2019, 07:19:35 PM »

Hey all!

So I have a bit of background in microbiology, and seeing the possibility of using small explants like leaf cuttings etc to produce mature plants, the ideal candidate to me seems to be salvia divinorum. Has anyone attempted micropropagation techniques on salvia? Given its reticence to form seeds, large leaves and relatively high desirability of cuttings seems like it could be a big boon if it can be made to work.

Thanks for your advice/opinion/experience etc in advance.
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TigerBeard

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Re: Salvia micropropagation
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2019, 08:54:51 PM »

Hello, I am currently looking for different strains of SD. I have Kratom cuttings I would be willing to trade. They are also unique Kratom plants as I have been able to adapt them to California’s arid environment. They are now hardy and grow smaller tougher leaves when compared to the bigger silky leaves. If they were to revert back to a humid environment I believe the leaf structure would return to the original form but may have retained certain genes that make the plant hardier and more survivable. Please let me know if you are interested. I am also looking for LW cacti
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ONandONandON

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Re: Salvia micropropagation
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2019, 10:15:38 PM »

Sally is a great candidate.. There was a company selling salvia plants in gel medium.. i imagine it would do very well.


tigerbeard; there is a 'trades' section where you might get better response.
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Solipsis

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Re: Salvia micropropagation
« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2019, 01:05:09 AM »

Sure they seem good for it but what would be the point?

Salvia is so easy to propagate the normal way... roots readily in water, you can clone all you like and before you know it have more than you know what to do with.
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CEY-19

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Re: Salvia micropropagation
« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2019, 10:18:03 AM »

Sure they seem good for it but what would be the point?

Salvia is so easy to propagate the normal way... roots readily in water, you can clone all you like and before you know it have more than you know what to do with.

Well, currently my plant only has a few shoots but a number of good leaves after growing through the winter. So if I can take micropropagation clones from a single leaf, it means I have clones to work with and to offer to other people whilst letting the lateral shoots I have develop. Basically, it would give the option to propagate without compromising the growing tips of the plant. Plus, a decent sized leaf could provide a lot more explants than you could take growing shoots from most plants I think.

Aside from the practical points, because why not try? It's an interesting experiment, if nothing else.
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Cannabisgardener

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Re: Salvia micropropagation
« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2019, 05:01:44 PM »

I've been thinking about picking up some ms and skoog if I can get my hands on some diplopterys, would probably try it on the whole garden, got the myco setup so wouldnt be to hard to transition some of my jars to microprop.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2019, 05:02:04 PM by Cannabisgardener »
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Solipsis

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Re: Salvia micropropagation
« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2019, 07:07:43 PM »

Yea i agree it's a great experiment and practice for other species.

But i just meant that my experience is that while initially it may be a slightly slow start, you can still take small cuttings from a single Salvia and they do not need growth tips but just nodes where they will easily sprout from. And i think they root from the internode just above a node but not sure IIRC.
It has to be the easiest plant i propagated, that is... until I started living in this apartment that dries out plants so hard that a lot suffer and even die.

Ah diplopterys, sounds cool - let us know how it goes. :)

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nobody

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Re: Salvia micropropagation
« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2019, 11:24:01 AM »

For sally, a section of apical meristem (root) or  is normally the best tissue donor. It has been some years since I last messed with mp but I will be starting again in a few weeks and plan to share the results this time lol.


nobody :)
« Last Edit: April 04, 2019, 11:24:52 AM by nobody »
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Solipsis

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Re: Salvia micropropagation
« Reply #8 on: April 04, 2019, 09:15:15 PM »

You mean apical meristem is the best micro explant to get a rooting plantlet? In general right?

But more in general as I understand it you would need to be ultra precise in your cut, probably needing a microscope.

Not sure about Salvia. I still think it would be doing propagation with SD the unnecessarily hard way unless it's either for practice or because you are losing your plant(s) to something, idk? Also it doesn't seem like a representive plant necessarily since it is a bit of an unusual species in how it propagates in nature apparently mostly by cloning itself basically.

So what i wonder is if it is good practice to see if you can get a good callus culture from it, if it can root rather easily. Would it not root even if you don't make an accurate cut?

Thanks for your answer, nobody, and sorry if i am beating any horses
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