Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Username: Password:
Pages: [1] 2

Author Topic: Germination of Lophophora Williamsii  (Read 35656 times)

New Wisdom

  • Professional Cactus Hoarder
  • Global Moderator
  • Karma: 179
  • Posts: 2270
  • Trading Score: +223
  • Zone 6B
Germination of Lophophora Williamsii
« on: June 13, 2013, 05:52:52 AM »

Hello friends.  I have some lophophora williamsii seeds that I would like to germinate.  I've got an idea of what I want to do, but I'd like to see how any of you like to do this.

What kind of soil do you use, what lighting conditions, temperature. Ect...

Thanks.
Logged
Cactus = Life

Sunshine

  • Global Moderator
  • Karma: 172
  • Posts: 1593
  • Trading Score: +96
  • Hibernating
Re: Germination of Lophophora Williamsii
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2013, 05:52:38 AM »

I read somewhere that they like clay type soils but also good drainage. If I were to grow this species I would do a mix of sand and clay with gravel at the bottom of the pot. =)
Logged

New Wisdom

  • Professional Cactus Hoarder
  • Global Moderator
  • Karma: 179
  • Posts: 2270
  • Trading Score: +223
  • Zone 6B
Re: Germination of Lophophora Williamsii
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2013, 05:56:30 AM »

So, I started 25 Lophophora williamsii today. 

They're in a soil mix made up of: 2 parts loam, 1 part worm castings, 2 parts dolemite lime, 3 parts perlite, 4 parts washed sand. I sieve this mixture up till it is like fine sand.

I put this in a shallow clear round dish with lots of drainage holes.  I let water soak up from the bottom and let it dry out for a few hours.  I put 25 seeds spread evenly on top of the soil and lightly pushed them down so they are just a little ways into the sandy mix. 

I then put the dish into my germination tank.  This tank has a T5 florescent bulb over it and a heating mat under.  The humidity level is 80-90% and the temp is usually around 80 degrees Fahrenheit.

Wish me luck! This is my first time growing lophophora from seed. 
Logged
Cactus = Life

New Wisdom

  • Professional Cactus Hoarder
  • Global Moderator
  • Karma: 179
  • Posts: 2270
  • Trading Score: +223
  • Zone 6B
Re: Germination of Lophophora Williamsii
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2013, 08:19:08 AM »

I read somewhere that they like clay type soils but also good drainage. If I were to grow this species I would do a mix of sand and clay with gravel at the bottom of the pot. =)

I decided to go with Spanishfly's lophophora soil mix.  He says that it works equally well with seeds. 
Logged
Cactus = Life

olyd88

  • Fallen Angel
  • Trader
  • Karma: 13
  • Posts: 181
  • Trading Score: +8
  • always positive!
Re: Germination of Lophophora Williamsii
« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2013, 01:09:27 PM »

So, I started 25 Lophophora williamsii today. 

They're in a soil mix made up of: 2 parts loam, 1 part worm castings, 2 parts dolemite lime, 3 parts perlite, 4 parts washed sand. I sieve this mixture up till it is like fine sand.

I put this in a shallow clear round dish with lots of drainage holes.  I let water soak up from the bottom and let it dry out for a few hours.  I put 25 seeds spread evenly on top of the soil and lightly pushed them down so they are just a little ways into the sandy mix. 

I then put the dish into my germination tank.  This tank has a T5 florescent bulb over it and a heating mat under.  The humidity level is 80-90% and the temp is usually around 80 degrees Fahrenheit.

Wish me luck! This is my first time growing lophophora from seed.

Any news with your Lophophora seeds NW?
Logged
Holy Family Ethnobotanical Garden Sdn.Bhd(2018-2030)

Sunshine

  • Global Moderator
  • Karma: 172
  • Posts: 1593
  • Trading Score: +96
  • Hibernating
Re: Germination of Lophophora Williamsii
« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2013, 07:26:38 PM »

I heard about some guy who planted 10 ariocarpus(A cousin to williamsii, iirc) seeds in pure coarse sand maybe 2-3 weeks ago. 2 out of 10 have sprouted so far.

It is my understanding that some cacti need light to sprout.
Logged

New Wisdom

  • Professional Cactus Hoarder
  • Global Moderator
  • Karma: 179
  • Posts: 2270
  • Trading Score: +223
  • Zone 6B
Re: Germination of Lophophora Williamsii
« Reply #6 on: July 12, 2013, 09:24:22 PM »

Well, 6/25 have sprouted.  It's kind of a bad germ rate.  But that's why i got some gibberellic acid. :D  Increase the germ rate.   I just got another 1000 seeds and a friend is sending me some more pereskiopsis.  I will be starting an HTTL (HydroTestTubeLophophora) set up.
Logged
Cactus = Life

Cane Blossom

  • Trader
  • Karma: 35
  • Posts: 136
  • Trading Score: +9
  • vibrational awareness
Re: Germination of Lophophora Williamsii
« Reply #7 on: July 13, 2013, 01:46:07 AM »

i noticed when i did my trich germination (saturated soil, microwaved for sterility, then put in a sealed tupperware when slightly cooled, and seeds sown on the surface) that the longer i let the container sit (kept moist), the more seeds finally germinated.

some took longer than 3 weeks.

i would think it is entirely possible that the ungerminated seeds are still viable
Logged
0 = -1 + 1
no thing = thing + unthing.
an infinite fractality of duality divided out of nothingness.
Ex nihil panton fit

cogito, ergo... cogito

the bong is my wind instrument

olyd88

  • Fallen Angel
  • Trader
  • Karma: 13
  • Posts: 181
  • Trading Score: +8
  • always positive!
Re: Germination of Lophophora Williamsii
« Reply #8 on: July 13, 2013, 05:03:54 AM »

Well, 6/25 have sprouted.  It's kind of a bad germ rate.  But that's why i got some gibberellic acid. :D  Increase the germ rate.   I just got another 1000 seeds and a friend is sending me some more pereskiopsis.  I will be starting an HTTL (HydroTestTubeLophophora) set up.

Yeah, that was bad germ rate, but you still have many seeds to go  :D, and Lophophora is truly one of the most beautiful plant i've ever seen to date. I can't wait to have my own  :P
Logged
Holy Family Ethnobotanical Garden Sdn.Bhd(2018-2030)

Shpongle Lover

  • Member
  • Karma: 45
  • Posts: 171
  • Trading Score: +3
Re: Germination of Lophophora Williamsii
« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2013, 02:28:48 AM »

Well, 6/25 have sprouted.  It's kind of a bad germ rate.  But that's why i got some gibberellic acid. :D  Increase the germ rate.   I just got another 1000 seeds and a friend is sending me some more pereskiopsis.  I will be starting an HTTL (HydroTestTubeLophophora) set up.

Hey, New Wisdom:  How about an update on your Lophophora project?  What was your final germination rate?  Do you feel the use of the Gibberellic acid helped at all with your germination rate?   Is there anything you would have done differently?

S.L.
Logged
You say you want a change, then make a change.

Sunshine

  • Global Moderator
  • Karma: 172
  • Posts: 1593
  • Trading Score: +96
  • Hibernating
Re: Germination of Lophophora Williamsii
« Reply #10 on: August 13, 2013, 02:43:07 AM »

iirc (correct me if I'm wrong) New wisdom said that germination rate differences were negligible up to 750 ppm and is currently testing germination rate with higher concentrations.

Here is a link to the gibberellic acid soak germination test thread- http://sharetheseeds.me/forum/index.php?topic=445.0
Logged

Shpongle Lover

  • Member
  • Karma: 45
  • Posts: 171
  • Trading Score: +3
Re: Germination of Lophophora Williamsii
« Reply #11 on: August 13, 2013, 03:00:44 AM »

Thanks!  I stumbled on it just as you were providing me with the link.  I was reading up on G.A. on Wikipedia and wondering just how advantageous it would be, and in which specific applications.  New Wisdom is once again ahead of the curve with the data acquisition on germination rates.

There seems to be no end to the intellectual curiosity and information sharing going on in this forum!  I'm exceedingly impressed with the effort and dedication to advancing botanical success and productivity demonstrated by you senior members.  Seriously.  Wow!

S.L.
Logged
You say you want a change, then make a change.

Sunshine

  • Global Moderator
  • Karma: 172
  • Posts: 1593
  • Trading Score: +96
  • Hibernating
Re: Germination of Lophophora Williamsii
« Reply #12 on: August 13, 2013, 03:26:24 AM »

I think it will interest you to know that there are many other easily obtainable things that can be used to increase germination rate and negate dormant periods. I posted a link in chat to an article about GA3 a couple days ago, in which, it had a list of said things. I'll see if I can find a link for you.

Here it is- http://www.jlhudsonseeds.net/GibberellicAcid.htm

2/3rds of the way down. Let me know what you think.(In pm, please. I don't want to clutter up wisdom's thread with off topic stuff.) :)
« Last Edit: August 13, 2013, 03:28:43 AM by Sunshine »
Logged

happyconcacti

  • Administrator
  • Karma: 188
  • Posts: 1356
  • Trading Score: +330
Re: Germination of Lophophora Williamsii
« Reply #13 on: October 27, 2013, 05:03:40 PM »

Any updates? Any recommended soil mixes? Temps?

I found this:
Quote
Germination of Lophophora species

Germinating seed of the Lophophora genus is quite easy, but requires time, dedication and patience. Growing cacti from seed will teach you patience like no other plant. Regular attention is required if seedlings are to be raised to adult stage successfully.

When germinating any seed, there are several critical factors: growing medium, air, moisture, light and temperature. earthalchemy has several years experience in germinating the Lophophora species, and although there are many different methods, each yielding varying success rates, discussion will be restricted to the method I have found to yield the best germination rates.

Growing Medium Coarse sharp sand serves best as a growing medium for Lophophora seedlings. From germination, the seedlings can be grown on in the sand, so long as fertiliser is included at 1/10 concentration when watering. Due to the non-porous nature of coarse sharp sand, watering is required regularly, every one or two days depending on temperature.

Sowing Fill seed-raising trays or pots (at least 1 1/2 inches deep) with coarse sharp sand. Sow seed on surface, and gently push in to a depth of twice the seed diametre with a pointed object. Wooden kebab skewers work well.

Watering Water in well by misting heavily with a garden spray bottle. Do not use a direct stream of water, as this will dislodge the seeds and disturb the growing medium. If seeds are pushed too deep into the medium, they may germinate and run out of nutrients before they break the surface and are exposed to light. Once germination occurs, misting should be conducted with fertiliser (Seaweed extract is good) at 1/10th strength.

Temperature Lophophora species germinate best at temperatures around 25-30 degrees Celsius. I have had excellent germination rates at temperatures as high as 32 deg C. However, I cycle heating so that for 16 hours daytime temperature is maintained, and then heating and light is turned off for the remainder of the day.

Lighting Normal flouroescent tubes provide ample lighting for germinating Lophophora seeds. Raise seed trays to sit 4 or 5 inches from the lights. As mentioned previously, I cycle lights to be switched off for 8 hours per day, synchronised with heating. If using household flouroescent tubes, they should be replaced every three months, as I am told that the spectrum required by plants decreases significantly over this time.

Germination Times The majority of seed should germinate within 1-2 weeks. However, further germinations may occur sporadically after this period.

From
http://www.earthalchemy.net/cultivation-sacred-cacti.html


Thank you,
Hcc
« Last Edit: October 27, 2013, 05:34:34 PM by happyconcafe »
Logged

happyconcacti

  • Administrator
  • Karma: 188
  • Posts: 1356
  • Trading Score: +330
Re: Germination of Lophophora Williamsii
« Reply #14 on: October 27, 2013, 05:23:46 PM »

And this one:

Quote
Propagation of Lophophora

Propagation is through seed, or cuttings which can be accelerated by grafting. In the wild, peyote will take three to fifteen years before reaching a point of flowering maturity. If conditions are controlled to that of optimum, these same plants can grow to a point of flowering maturity within two to three years or less. And if one wishes to really speed up the process of growing mature plants from seed, then grafting is the way to go. If one starts out by grafting one, two, or three month old seedling, it is possible to get flowers that produce viable seed about six months later.

How do I know? From personal experience. In fact, I have personally been able to achieve a flowering plant from seed by grafting within seven months of planting the seed. The same plant put out its first fruit with seed by its tenth month. For those that are a little nervous to try their hand at grafting or just prefer a hard grown plant from seed I also have good news. When proper conditions are offered one can have a plant flowering within as little as one year and a half, just as in the picture you see here below. This batch of Lophophora Williamsii was planted December 14th 2006, and put out its first flower by June 11th 2008. If I can do this, I am sure that anyone with the desire to grow such a beautiful plant can too... and that means you!!

The most important things to understand are that seed fertility, moisture, temperature, soil mix, and light all affect seed germination.

Soil conditions for the cultivation of peyote are not too critical. The natural soil for peyote is of limestone having a basic pH from 7.9 to 8.3., so one should provide adequate calcium (limestone chippings are best if available), and most importantly provide good drainage. There are many combinations possible when making peyote soil. Sand, peat, limestone, blood meal, bone meal, potting soil, bat guano, rabbit shit, vermiculite, perlite, and polymers are commonly used. Doesn’t make much difference so long as there is no extreme condition created causing such things as nitrogen burn, saline dehydration, or mud, so long as you provide for excellent drainage. Most of my friendly clients ask what my specific mix is in order to match it if they can so here it is, but you don't have to follow it exactly. Before I offer it you must know that this mix is for any and all cacti I grow once they pass the first stage of repotting after the seed tray. All my seedlings are germinated in "Premier” Pro Mix for seedlings. Now here you go:

My Own Special Cactus Mix : I use one part quarter chip gravel, one part quarter chip limestone screenings, one part mid ph pumas, one part perlite, and one and a half parts earth worm casings. For those that don't want to spend very much money a decent mix that should do well is taking any bag of commercial cactus soil and adding fifty percent perlite to improve drainage and hardening from the sand often added.

All cacti (especially cuttings) need a low nitrogen, high phosphorous fertilizer to stimulate root development and proper tissue consistency.

nitrogen will dramatically increase growth rate, the cacti could swell, split and or become hollow. During the fall and winter such plants have a lower survival rate because they’ll be unable to “harden off” against the cold.

Seeds should be as fresh as possible, although seeds that have been kept in a cool environment have been known to keep for years. Seeds may lay dormant for years and still remain viable if kept dry and away from light. However, fresh seeds are more likely to be vital and should be planted as soon as proper conditions are available. Seed fertility, moisture, temperature, soil mix, and light all affect seed germination. Seeds should be started in lidded trays, or in small pots covered by a sandwich bag.

Lophophora Williamsii Seed Growing Instructions

1 – Fill seed trays or small pots with compost mix and flatten mix down gently. (Any seedling mix purchased at your home and garden centre will do. Premier” Pro Mix found at Rona is one of the best.)

2 – Soak the compost using boiling water to kill parasites. Once soaked, allow to drain and cool for about an hour.

3 – Sprinkle seeds evenly over the compost mix, and then gently press seeds down and level with top of mix using a spoon.

4 – Cover with seed tray cover, or enclose pots in zip lock plastic bags.

5 – Place under grow lights or in a well lit window but not in direct sunlight as this could scorch your seedlings. Temperature should be between 60 to 100 degrees F (15 degrees C to 37.5 degrees C).

6 – If pots are placed in zip lock bags water might not be needed for months. If seed trays begin to dry out, spray to moisten the surface.

7 – Seeds should germinate within 2 to 14 days.

8 – When seedlings are about six weeks old begin sliding tops of trays a little each day to acclimatize seedlings to surrounding environment. If using pots in zip lock bags, begin poking small holes each day for a couple of weeks to acclimatize seedlings.

9 - Keep seedlings in indirect sunlight for about six months, and then slowly let them have more light. Seedlings should have a lush green color if the light levels are right. If the epidermis turns red it means they are getting too much light. If so raise lights or shade window with appropriate material possibly cheese cloth.

10 – Be in no hurry to repot your seedlings. Lophophora enjoys the company of others, so wait until they are really fighting for room.

Seedlings will germinate in three to ten days, but can and have germinated in as little as twenty four hours. Initially they’ll appear as little green balls, but a trained eye will soon notice the cotyledons and first set of areoles.

Extra Growing Information for the Real Enthusiast

Lights – I keep my lights on using timers. Nothing elaborate is needed. Lights should be turned on for twelve to sixteen hours a day.

Temperatures – Most plants seem to like like fluctuating temperature, Lophophora does as well. If the temperature is either to hot or too cold seeds will not germinate. Lophophora seems to bear temperatures between 5 and 41 degrees C. For germination purposes I have found that a day time temperature of anything from 25 to 41 degrees C works very well, so long as the night time temperature does decrease. Night time temperatures should drop lower than 25 degrees C, and as low as 10 degrees C. There seems to be a cross over between day and night time temperature that actually cause the seeds to sprout, and unless this cross over is met most of your seeds will not germinate. The maximum temperatures vary from 29.1 degrees centigrade to 40.2 degrees, and minimum temperatures range from 1.9 to 10.2 degrees centigrade. Also, in the wild Lophophora exhibits a wide range of aridity, between 64.0 and 394.0.

Adult Peyote plants can tolerate temperatures within a range of 45-100 degrees Fahrenheit. If soil is kept dry, it can survive temperatures as low as 30o F. Frequent watering and a shade cloth will protect it from temperatures exceeding 120 degrees F. Peyote is very sensitive to frost or prolonged near freezing temperatures and is easily injured or killed by frost. It should be brought inside in locations where the temperatures drop below 40 degrees F.

Water - In the growing season, I water my plants twice a week on a regular basis. Some might think this excessive but my plants are robust and very healthy. I also add a very light fertilizer with every watering.

From:
http://www.magicactus.com/propagation.html

I highly recommend clicking ^^^ that link to read more.

Hcc
« Last Edit: October 27, 2013, 06:55:09 PM by happyconcafe »
Logged
Pages: [1] 2