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Author Topic: Plant Identification Thread  (Read 177622 times)

Seed Collector

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Plant Identification Thread
« on: January 07, 2014, 09:26:34 pm »

Before I try to key out these plants, I'll post them here to see if anyone already knows what they are.
Feel free to give them an attempt, or to post your own plants for an identification assist.

Seed Collector's unknown plant #1   (this plant is about 2.5 to 3 feet tall at maturity)

Seed Collector

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Re: Plant Identification Thread
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2014, 09:33:55 pm »

Seed Collector's unknown plant #2    (this plant is a fairly tall shrub or bush that has purple flowers)

Auxin

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Re: Plant Identification Thread
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2014, 10:37:22 pm »

Plant #2 looks to be an ornamental variety/hybrid of Hibiscus syriacus. Flowers match, perhaps compare leaves as it might possibly be a different Hibiscus species.
Leaves and flowers are food and tea, decoction of flowers is for itchy/dry skin (add a pinch of oatmeal and filter through a old shirt if your short on flowers), and folk wisdom says the flower decoction is good for when your dizzy, gassy, and crapping out blood... but I'd differ and say go to the hospital instead  :P
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Seed Collector

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Re: Plant Identification Thread
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2014, 10:47:22 pm »

Thank you Auxin, I believe you're correct, Hibiscus syriacus it is.  :)

PermieGing

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Re: Plant Identification Thread
« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2014, 10:49:13 pm »

Plant #1 is likely a member of the fabaceae family.

Thats all i can narrow it down to :P
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Auxin

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Re: Plant Identification Thread
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2014, 03:00:44 am »

For plant #1, my guess is Chamaecrista fasciculata or possibly C. nictitans
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Seed Collector

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Re: Plant Identification Thread
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2014, 04:10:58 am »

For plant #1, my guess is Chamaecrista fasciculata or possibly C. nictitans

After reviewing that genus, it is undoubtedly Chamaecrista; after measuring these seed pods, I found these measure up to about 60.325mm.

The fruit length of Chamaecrista fasciculata (Michx.) Greene is 30–60 mm, while fruit length of Chamaecrista nictitans (L.) Moench is 20–40 mm

conclusion: Seed Collector's unknown plant #1 = Chamaecrista fasciculata & Seed Collector's unknown plant #2 = Hibiscus syriacus

https://gobotany.newenglandwild.org/species/chamaecrista/nictitans/ & https://gobotany.newenglandwild.org/species/chamaecrista/fasciculata/

"Chamaecrista fasciculata Fabaceae (Pea Family)

Partridge Pea- a herbaceous annual found in well-drained open areas throughout the southeastern United States and in all but 4 north central Florida Counties.

Native American Indians used the roots of this plant as a medicine to keep people from tiring. The leaves were used to make a tea to prevent fainting. Syrups (decoctions) with added honey were given to treat nausea. Syrups were made by boiling parts of the plant in water and then straining the mixture and adding a second ingredient to improve the flavor."

source: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw152 <-- 50 Common Native Plants Important In Florida's Ethnobotanical History

Thank you everyone, with special thanks to Auxin  :)
« Last Edit: January 09, 2014, 04:55:51 am by Seed Collector »
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fairdinkumseeds

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Re: Plant Identification Thread
« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2014, 10:21:42 am »

This a really awesome herb I see a lot at the local markets.
I have seen it called nutmeg herb, cinnamon plant, pudding herb, allspice plant among a myriad of other names.
Anyone know the real latin/scientific/family name?
Never sets seed, has a sort of tuberous trunk like a skinny bottle tree.
Very hardy and cuttings are pretty easy to strike. Tastes great in rice pudding or custards.
Even guess's would be a start.
Been Googling it on an off for a couple years, whenever I think of it.
Thoughts?
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fairdinkumseeds

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Re: Plant Identification Thread
« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2014, 11:46:06 am »

Thanks to spamming FB I have an answer! (I should have done that ages ago. Wasted hrs searching!)

Iboza riparia, Tetradenia riparia
Family: Lamiaceae / Labiatae
Musk Bush, Misty Plume Bush, Ginger Bush, Gemmerbos, Watersalie
Origin: Eastern and Southern Africa
The name ibosa was derived from the Zulu word referring to the aromatic leaves - they use this plant medicinally. The Zulu people have many uses for the plant including the relief of chest complaints, stomach ache and malaria. Inhaling the scent of the crushed leaves apparently also relieves headaches. The plant is frost tender and best suited to pot culture in colder regions. This is a rewarding garden plant which is fast growing
****************************************************************
I sent some to a couple folks but didn't know the name, just called it nutmeg plant. This is it.
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fairdinkumseeds

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Re: Plant Identification Thread
« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2014, 08:12:13 am »

Still cleaning up the greenhouse, recycling the corpses and dead pots.
Found another unknown with the wrong tag.
I believe its not a weed as I have never seen it before anywhere in OZ, and I have one more out in the rows that looks identical that looks like I planted it on purpose.
No idea what it is, you guys got any guesses?

EDIT  Leonurus Sibiricus
« Last Edit: February 18, 2016, 12:42:42 am by fairdinkumseeds »
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Mandrake

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Re: Plant Identification Thread
« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2014, 05:57:09 pm »

^ Not sure at first sight. Do the leaves have any fragrance? It has a vaguely solanaceous form.

and off-topic, I'm moving this thread to the Botanical Information forum, I think it really belongs with the other ID and reference resources.

Kind regards,

Mandrake
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Sunshine

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Re: Plant Identification Thread
« Reply #11 on: January 27, 2014, 10:24:47 pm »

The flower seed collector posted is a rose of sharon, just incase you haven't figured it out already. It does look similar to hibiscus but its not big enough.

As for fairdinkums picture, I'm still trying to ID it...
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fairdinkumseeds

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Re: Plant Identification Thread
« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2014, 05:18:39 am »

Place your bets folks.

Is it Voacanga Africana or Celastrus paniculatus?
Any one here grown either from seed before and able to ID it at this stage for me.


UPDATE
Latest pic of the little fella.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2014, 01:56:41 am by fairdinkumseeds »
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nobody

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Re: Plant Identification Thread
« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2014, 09:12:45 am »

I would say Voacanga, but maybe it´s a bit early. :)
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fairdinkumseeds

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Re: Plant Identification Thread
« Reply #14 on: March 29, 2014, 02:17:08 am »

Yet another one I need an ID for.
I might have got the seed from someone here and it not germinated, then come up later in the new pot when I recycled the potting mix? ???
Anyway, here it is.
Acacia/mimosa looking dude. Not Acacia maidenii as it was labelled.
Thoughts?
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