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Author Topic: Flowers for Bees  (Read 5896 times)

Sunshine

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Flowers for Bees
« on: November 26, 2013, 04:36:21 am »

I just came across this list of plants that are listed with their attributes with regard to nectar and pollen. I've noticed that goldenrod, alfalfa, mint, dandelion, and clover are some of the most mentioned plants in articles on which flowering plants honey bees love. I think it would be a safe bet to say that if those were planted around your beehives the bees would be more than happy. All of those plant seeds are easily obtainable and, depending on your location, grow wildly. In my area dandelion and clover are almost considered weeds they grow so abundantly. The leaves of the latter are actually used by my grandmother to make Italian style salads.

Next spring/summer I can get as many dandelion seeds as I want and anyone is welcome to have some, gratis. Mint also grows in one part of my yard prolifically and its cuttings are easily rooted with no hormones whatsoever. If anyone wants some feel free to message me.

Attached is a pdf of plants which produce flowers that honeybees love. Enjoy! :)
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Seedling88

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Re: Flowers for Bees
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2013, 02:14:42 am »

Saw a special on T.V. and one farmer said this species provided for the best type of honey.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tupelo
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PermieGing

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Re: Flowers for Bees
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2013, 02:23:48 am »

Theres also regional specialty honey that is often more valuable because of how rare it is.


Theres no really "best" honey as far as a specific nectar. However there are flowers that are the most prominent and unique flower of the area and produce nectar with a unique taste. These would be the regional honeys.

In my area, this would be sourwood.
My dad said tupelo is for the texas area


I had no idea that honeybees were into mint. I must grow more!! I bet that a predominantly mint honey would have a very interesting taste!
Mint is also evergreen and encourages other beneficial insects. However its got some tiny seeds!
Hehe
« Last Edit: December 09, 2013, 02:29:38 am by PermieGing »
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Seedling88

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Re: Flowers for Bees
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2013, 03:03:26 am »

Thanks for the input Permie, that makes since.  My father is getting some bees from my uncle from down in Georgia this year.
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Turk0lok0

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Re: Flowers for Bees
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2015, 02:28:01 am »

Acnistus arborences(fruta do sabia), that the meliponidae love that flowers cause provides nectar and pollen!! this specie of bees are stingless...and some popular knowledge says that produce a medicinal honey!
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MirlitonVine

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Re: Flowers for Bees
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2015, 10:47:58 pm »

I can't believe I didn't think of this, but last year I noticed that my bundleflowers were always being frequented by bees. They had the most bees of of all my plants.
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nobody

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Re: Flowers for Bees
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2015, 10:17:18 am »

Rivea corymbosa is used by most bee farmers in Cuba. It is a great source for those in warm climates.


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MirlitonVine

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Re: Flowers for Bees
« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2015, 05:11:21 am »

Rivea corymbosa is used by most bee farmers in Cuba. It is a great source for those in warm climates.


nobody

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expanding

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Re: Flowers for Bees
« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2015, 09:17:44 pm »

The best tasting honey i have tried was cactus honey from morocco, i beleive the cactus which the bees gathered from was primarily prickly pear (Opuntia). I expect other cacti could produce nice flavours though :)
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MadPlanter

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Re: Flowers for Bees
« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2016, 03:39:30 pm »

The bees here absolutely love spiderwort flowers. Anyone interested in spiderwort for their bees or just a pretty yard wild flower hit me up!
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EIRN

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Re: Flowers for Bees
« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2016, 03:43:10 pm »

Oncimum spp. are great for the bees, as medicinal plant and to add more flavor in our plates! Lamiaceae plants (includes sages) are good plants for bees.

Also my Caapi plants are visited by a huge variety of bees and other insects.
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MadPlanter

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Re: Flowers for Bees
« Reply #11 on: July 05, 2016, 06:01:17 pm »

For anyone in the right climate tupelo trees produce a world famous honey. My property I'll be moving to in the coming months is in the heart of tupelo honey production. I want to get in on that someday!

Also manuka trees from New Zealand produce a unique and medicinal honey.

Anybody know what plant in African contributes to the making of the so called entheogenic honey?
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Sunshine

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Re: Flowers for Bees
« Reply #12 on: July 05, 2016, 06:15:37 pm »

The ethneogenic honey is made from rhododendron flowers. I imagine one could actually encourage bees to make it locally by planting lots of rhododendrons near the hive. Being that I plan on selling/giving away my honey to family as Christmas gifts I wouldn't do it, though. It'd be too dangerous.

If you're interested in getting started I can help you out with regards to guiding you on what you'll need as well as other golden tid bits of knowledge. There is TONS of stuff to learn about beekeeping. A lot of people think it's as simple as putting bees in a box but it is so much more complex than that.
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Skink

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Re: Flowers for Bees
« Reply #13 on: July 27, 2016, 09:51:59 pm »

I know most people cut the flowers off their basil to encourage leaf growth but I usually at least leave a few on there because the bees go NUTS for them. I always feel bad for them when I'm trimming flowers off because they're always there collecting nectar.
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Frog Pajamas

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Re: Flowers for Bees
« Reply #14 on: July 27, 2016, 10:04:18 pm »

We seriously have like a hive worth of bees that come to the datura every evening when the flowers start to open. Wonder who's eating that honey  :o
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