Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Username: Password:

Author Topic: Stingless social bee  (Read 193 times)

EIRN

  • Golden Member
  • Senior Member
  • Karma: 112
  • Posts: 708
  • Trading Score: +212
Stingless social bee
« on: September 03, 2017, 02:07:50 am »

I'm starting in beekeeping with native stingless bee called Jataí.
I saw some videos showing how to build a nest.
I decided to do a model called AF, instead INPA (more commom and more easy).
Logged

Dexter123

  • Karma: 0
  • Posts: 9
Re: Stingless social bee
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2017, 02:15:59 pm »

very interesting.

I have not seen this type of hive design before. get us some more pics after there are bees and comb in it.

I have kept bees two different times, only used the usual 10 frame hive. neither time was i very successful, eventually they succumbed to disease,pest and weather. I had been thinking if i did it again i would use top bar hive style, tho seeing this definately opens the mind to other possibilities.

stingless bees huh?

Is this that they dont have a stinger, or that they have been bred to be docile?

I will gogole it.  ;D
Logged

EIRN

  • Golden Member
  • Senior Member
  • Karma: 112
  • Posts: 708
  • Trading Score: +212
Re: Stingless social bee
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2017, 04:27:36 pm »

Stingless bees in South America are from Meliponini tribe. Sting is stunted.

Your bees probably are Apis sp.

Meliponini bees usually are smaller and the hive have fewer bees (300 - 2000 bees), so the hive to Meliponini is smaller.

Here is some things about Meliponini to you see...but it is all in portuguese.

Hives to Jataí (smaller Meliponini)
https://lojadasabelhas.com.br/departamentos/Caixas-Abelha-Sem-Ferrao/Jatai/

Hives to Uruçu (bigger, almost the sema size of Apis)
https://lojadasabelhas.com.br/departamentos/Caixas-Abelha-Sem-Ferrao/Urucu/

Video about Jataí hive management
Logged

ONandONandON

  • Trader
  • Karma: 18
  • Posts: 223
  • Trading Score: +45
  • Looking 4 Supercalifragilistic Expialidocious Spp.
Re: Stingless social bee
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2017, 07:15:13 pm »

Very Cool ive never seen that design either or that type of bee.. i want some!
Logged
we all come from the garden and to it we shall return

EIRN

  • Golden Member
  • Senior Member
  • Karma: 112
  • Posts: 708
  • Trading Score: +212
Re: Stingless social bee
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2017, 02:14:23 am »

Very Cool ive never seen that design either or that type of bee.. i want some!

More about

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stingless_bee
Logged

ONandONandON

  • Trader
  • Karma: 18
  • Posts: 223
  • Trading Score: +45
  • Looking 4 Supercalifragilistic Expialidocious Spp.
Re: Stingless social bee
« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2017, 02:39:43 am »

...just emailed the USDA about importing Melipona bees from Brazil, i'd be surprised if they reply...

Quote
With more than 300 species already identified the research of Brazilian stingless bees is a vast field. But American researches could focus on the few species that are found in the more temperate regions of the country, or that have specific features that can help them to adapt to colder environments. I’m not really an specialist, but from my research in the net and contact with some breeders I could suggest the list of species below:

- Jataí (Tetragonisca Angustula): Small and slender bee, with length about 5mm. Very adaptable, using all flowers available to collect pollen and nectar. Being so small it cannot resist to very low temperatures, and usually will only leave the hive if temperature is above 12 to 15 degrees (always Celsius), but colonies can survive to temperatures below 0°C in a dormant state for a period of a few weeks. The adult individuals can survive to temperatures about 0 degrees, but the larvae will die if temperature inside the nest gets lower than 15 degrees, so the hive must be provided with a heating system, similar to those used in tropical fish tanks. Colonies can have over 3.000 bees, and will produce from 0,5 to 0,75 liters of honey a year (1,5 in exceptional cases, if nest conditions are suitable, weather is adequate and flowers are available). In cold regions they can be artificially fed during the winter, with pots of food placed inside the hive. Their honey has 10 times the amount of antibiotic substances than the Apis genus honey, and is thus considered to have medicinal properties. The species is defensive, and can nip with their jaws if the hive is molested, but they are not strong enough to cause any pain and in practice are harmless.
bbf6ac29314b5fc4a67b377447253d47.jpg


-Manduri (Melipona Marginata): Small bee measuring about 7mm in length. Their colonies are quite small, with only about 300 bees, which makes it indicated to be kept inside small glasshouses as pollinators. It is not very exigent about the flowers to visit either. Despite the small size of their colonies, each one can produce from 1,5 to 2 liters of honey a year (and up to 3 liters in special conditions), so it is probably the most productive bee in the world considering the individual productivity. As the Jataí, the Manduri can survive to moderate low temperatures, provided the nest has a heating system. But will only leave the hive in environment temperatures above 12 to 15 degrees. If honey is not harvested probably the colonies can survive the winter, otherwise artificial food must be provided. Although not aggressive, will react if the nest is molested, nipping strongly and not releasing their jaws until death. They can cause a little pain but no important injuries to humans. Anyway, it is recommended some protection to manipulate the nest for honey harvesting or other purposes.
manduri.jpg


-Mandaçaia (Melipona Quadrifasciata): Probably the tamest of all stingless bees, this medium sized bee which reaches about 11 mm in length is reasonably well adapted to low temperatures, starting to harvest pollen and nectar as soon as environment temperature rises above 5 to 6 degrees. Hives made of thick wood (4 to 5 centimeters) do not need heating if lowest environment temperature don’t go below -10 degrees for too long (not more than a few weeks). Colony size varies from 500 to 600 individuals, and can produce 2 to 3 liters of honey a year (4 liters in exceptional conditions). They are so peaceful the nest can be manipulated without protection even by small kids. On the other hand, the species is somewhat picky with respect to the flowers it will visit, preferring the flora of its original environment in Brazilian east coast, and there’s not much data about its adaptation to other plant species. Probably will do well with flowers from trees like apple and peach, but this must be tested for confirmation.
manda%u0025C3%u0025A7aia.jpg


- Guaraipo (Melipona Bicolor): Also a very tame species, the Guaraipo can reach about 10mm in length and its nest can be manipulated without any protection. It is not as exigent as the Mandaçaia regarding the flowers to visit, and can also collect pollen and nectar in temperatures as low as 5 degrees. Their hives won’t need heating if well isolated from cold and the ambient temperature does not go below -10 degrees for too long. If it happens, heating must be provided to keep nest inner temperature above 12 - 15 degrees or all larvae will die. Their colonies are also small, with 600 bees or so, and will produce from 1,5 to 2 liters of honey a year (3 liters in exceptional conditions). During winter probably some artificial feeding will be needed even if no honey is harvested. The Guaraipo is quite sensitive to low humidity levels, and will not survive in regions with dry weather. In such situations keeping water reservoirs inside the hive have proven to be effective. This species is interesting for usually having more than one queen per colony at a time (up to 5 have been seen), with makes the survival more likely as the death of a queen will not affect too much the colony.
guaraipo1.jpg


-Uruçu amarela (Melipona Rufiventris): This is a very productive species, that can reach about the same size as the Guaraipo, but form much larger colonies, containing from 3.500 to 5.000 bees which can produce about 6 liters of honey a year (up to 10 in exceptional conditions). It is not very selective about the flowers to visit either. Can survive quite well in moderately cold regions, working to collect pollen and nectar when temperature is as low as 5 degrees.When installed in thick wood hives, with good heat insulation, strong colonies can probably survive winter without heating, even if temperature goes slightly below zero for a few weeks. If honey is not harvested they probably won't need to be fed either. Despite been stingless and not agressive, this species can be reasonably defensive if the hive is molested, and will nip with their jaws causing moderate pain. It is recommended the use of protection to manipulate their nests.
DSC02799.jpg


-Iraí (Nannotrigona Testaceicornis): This is a small size species, reaching less than 5mm in length. It is very tame and completely harmless, so can be easily manipulated with no protection at all. These very small bees would not survive in the open in cold regions, but adapts quite well in densely populated areas, even in big cities. The worker bees close the entrance of the nest when the night falls, so they are not attracted by light sources as lamps, and this way can be kept inside houses, protected from the cold. The bees can go out thru the windows in warm seasons and be artificially fed in cold seasons. The colonies can have from 2.000 to 3000 individuals, but being so tiny they produce only a very small amount of a very tasteful honey (less than 0,5 liters a year) and are not of interest for commercial production. But they can make perfect pets for those who like exotic animals, or pollinate glasshouses. The colony needs very few space, and can be kept inside small ornamented hives resembling model houses, Farbergé eggs or other decorative objects.
Nannotrigona_testaceicornis_AMNH_BEE-,I_HHG1839.jpg



All those species are already successfully kept by Brazilian meliponicultors, and are easily found in the market. Inside the country they can be ordered by e-mail or phone. I believe they could be a good start for American researchers.
http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?241040-Anyone-raise-Stingless-Bees-in-USA
« Last Edit: September 04, 2017, 02:40:31 am by ONandONandON »
Logged
we all come from the garden and to it we shall return