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Author Topic: Making Biannuals Bloom during the first year?  (Read 1703 times)

The Clam

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Making Biannuals Bloom during the first year?
« on: July 26, 2017, 09:26:31 am »

Is this possible?
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LIBERTYNY

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Re: Making Biannuals Bloom during the first year?
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2017, 06:17:08 am »

  Some will if they are started early enough (Valerian)

I think I have heard of PGS's being used for this purpose ? 
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The Clam

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Re: Making Biannuals Bloom during the first year?
« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2017, 06:38:53 am »

PGS?
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LIBERTYNY

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Re: Making Biannuals Bloom during the first year?
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2017, 06:23:39 am »

 Sorry not PGS  but  PGR's  -    Plant Growth Regulators  or just hormones like kinetin,   indole-3-butyric-acid,   Brassionlide,   Paclobutrazol,   Indole 3 Acetic Acid, ect. ect.
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The Clam

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Re: Making Biannuals Bloom during the first year?
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2017, 10:10:52 pm »

Sorry not PGS  but  PGR's  -    Plant Growth Regulators  or just hormones like kinetin,   indole-3-butyric-acid,   Brassionlide,   Paclobutrazol,   Indole 3 Acetic Acid, ect. ect.

Ohh right on. I defiantly wouldn't want to do that, those are generally my last resort.
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GrowerAndaShower

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Re: Making Biannuals Bloom during the first year?
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2017, 08:19:00 pm »

Would it be possible to force it to think two years has passed by shortening day length indoors, cooling the room, leaving it for a month or so in those conditions, then returning it to warm/long days? Might depend on the plant, maybe some actually need a long enough time to mature and others are just looking to go through a winter as a trigger?

Just a thought, and maybe this isn't viable for you Clam, but might be worth a try?

Mind if I ask what you're aiming for flowers on?

The Clam

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Re: Making Biannuals Bloom during the first year?
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2017, 04:30:20 am »

Would it be possible to force it to think two years has passed by shortening day length indoors, cooling the room, leaving it for a month or so in those conditions, then returning it to warm/long days? Might depend on the plant, maybe some actually need a long enough time to mature and others are just looking to go through a winter as a trigger?

Just a thought, and maybe this isn't viable for you Clam, but might be worth a try?

Mind if I ask what you're aiming for flowers on?

Il have to try some things and dream root, carrots and a few other vegetables. but also plants in general. Mullein, radishs, beets, kale and things like that I like to grow as well but they end up producing flowers at the wrong times and messing up the cycle before I can get seeds.
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BubbleCat

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Re: Making Biannuals Bloom during the first year?
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2017, 02:49:16 pm »

I've found that in general plants that are potted in a pot that is too small for full development will dwarf but develop quicker, they will flower sooner but less.

Blooming is triggered by circumstances that vary from plant to plant and might be a combination of circumstances like photoperiod, temperature ...

I am certain that it is possible with some biannuals, harder with others and likely completely impossible with others again. So a good answer would require a more specific question. I suggest digging into the principle that triggers bloom in the species.

BTW: I believe it is more likely from a plant growing closer to the equator to rely on phitoperiod as a trigger, further from the equator it is more likely to be other circumstances, like age or temperature. Compare C. Ruderalis to C. Indica as an example.

Start here (especially first chapters) for example to obtain more insight into plant time perception:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photoperiodism
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4414745/ and maybe find your 'point of attack' in the mechanism.

Questions I would like to raise:
Would a plant spontaneously flower in a desperate effort to reproduce if troubled  ?
Could some plants be encouraged to flower by presence of a flowering specimen ? I think I've heard of such thing... but dont remember.
Is there plants that flower depending on water supply, maybe from monsum climates ?
« Last Edit: August 02, 2017, 03:05:15 pm by BubbleCat »
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The Clam

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Re: Making Biannuals Bloom during the first year?
« Reply #8 on: August 02, 2017, 10:24:50 pm »

Thanks for the info :) and those are interesting question. Never heard of a plant flowering in the presence of a flowering plant though, maybe its a gaseous hormone given off if this is true.
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