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Gardening Area => Beekeeping => Topic started by: mj on May 14, 2016, 05:51:49 am

Title: An invention to save the bees
Post by: mj on May 14, 2016, 05:51:49 am
http://www.chonday.com/Videos/beesavetherm4

Thermosolar Hive is a game changer in beekeeping. No more will Varroa destructor mites kill bee colonies. No more will beekeepers be forced to use chemicals inside their beehives. Thermosolar Hive produces healthy honey and support health of bees.
Title: Re: An invention to save the bees
Post by: Sunshine on May 16, 2016, 03:33:32 am
Very interesting type of hive. I haven't seen this type of hive yet. Thanks for sharing! +1

This may only work for so long though, since I imagine eventually you'd get a couple mites that survive the high temps and adapt their genetics. I could be and I hope that I'm wrong though.

P.S. I used an oxalic acid spray as an initial treatment for mites when I hived my bees. oxalic acid is relatively safe at low levels. It's found at around 1.5% in rhubarb. I treated with 2.5% iirc. It's similar to citric acid but is a more destructive in a way I can't remember at the moment.

Title: Re: An invention to save the bees
Post by: mj on May 16, 2016, 04:18:19 am
more methods...

https://beecare.bayer.com/media-center/news/news-detail/a-new-way-of-protecting-bees-against-varroa-mites

https://www.cals.ncsu.edu/entomology/apiculture/pdfs/2.03%20copy.pdf

http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com/Resources/VarroaMites.asp

http://scientificbeekeeping.com/powdered-sugar-dusting-sweet-and-safe-but-does-it-really-work-part-1/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnOM5gYxoCk

http://phys.org/news/2012-10-fungus-deadly-bee-mites-two-pronged.html

http://www.fungi.net/blog/bee-friendly-research-update

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/10/09/446928755/could-a-mushroom-save-the-honeybee

http://crosscut.com/2015/02/can-mushrooms-save-honeybee/

Title: Re: An invention to save the bees
Post by: MadPlanter on May 16, 2016, 04:29:48 am
Very interesting type of hive. I haven't seen this type of hive yet. Thanks for sharing! +1

This may only work for so long though, since I imagine eventually you'd get a couple mites that survive the high temps and adapt their genetics. I could be and I hope that I'm wrong though.

P.S. I used an oxalic acid spray as an initial treatment for mites when I hived my bees. oxalic acid is relatively safe at low levels. It's found at around 1.5% in rhubarb. I treated with 2.5% iirc. It's similar to citric acid but is a more destructive in a way I can't remember at the moment.

Oxalic acid disrupts calcium uptake in humans
Title: Re: An invention to save the bees
Post by: Hummingbird on May 29, 2016, 07:41:39 pm
I love seeing more and more interest in saving the bees. I get honey from my relatives who keep bees, they use no chemicals whatsoever. It's way different than the "regular" honey.
Would love to have a hive, but for now only something like this would be possible:

http://www.odditycentral.com/animals/the-beecosystem-lets-you-use-bees-as-indoor-pets.html

 ;D

Indoors might be safer environment for the bees, so maybe it's not a bad idea.
This particular hive seems too small for the whole bee colony though.